Crochet Ice Skate Ornaments

As mentioned in my previous post, I gave Christmas gifts to my department this year, and these handmade ornaments were the easy part. My grandmother made a few for each of her children many years ago, and I snagged one from my parents house and did my best to duplicate what she did.

Tools:
2 jumbo paper clips
2 colors of contrasting yarn
F hook

Instructions:

Row 1: Starting with whatever color you’ve chosen as the main skate color, make 10 sc in the top of the paper clip (I found that 8 sc in the bigger section and 2 sc at the end worked best for me).
Row 2: Don’t make a chain here! Skip the first sc, sc in the next st, hdc in the following st, and then dc to the end of the row (you will have a total of 1 sc, 1 hdc, and 7 dc).
Row 3: Ch 2 (counts as first dc), dc to end.
Rows 4-6: Repeat row 3.
Fasten off, then repeat for the second skate.

For the yarn with which you will hang them, I cut 2 lengths of yarn a little more than  twice as long as I wanted them to hang. Take one, fold it in half, and thread the loop through a corner of the skate (either will do, as long as you do the same corner for both skates). Then, take the length and pull it through the loop you just made to attach it. Repeat for both skates, then tie the loose ends together.

With the contrasting color, weave the laces – I cut off 10-12 inches to do this (I learned my lesson quickly; tying knots with tiny bits of yarn is super difficult). It’s difficult to explain this process in words, so hopefully the photos below will help illustrate. (It isn’t unlike lacing a regular shoe…if you didn’t have lace holes, at least.)

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/773/15438368/files/2015/01/img_6979.jpg

I’m pretty pleased with how they turned out! It’s a pretty easy and quick project, so it’s great for group gifts, like these.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/773/15438368/files/2015/01/img_6981.jpg

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/773/15438368/files/2015/01/img_6982.jpg

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/773/15438368/files/2015/01/img_6984.jpg

Advertisements

Santa Hat Pattern

My sister-in-law asked me if I could create a Santa inspired hat (initially for New York SantaCon). She texted me a photo for inspiration, and I came up with this:

Sorry everyone, I’m not single.

I even remembered to write down the pattern!

Hat

Create a magic ring.
Round 1: Chain 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout; the first dc in each round should be a ch3!), 9 dc (10 dc)
Round 2: 2 dc in each dc (20 dc)
Round 3: *2dc in first dc, 1 dc in next dc* repeat from * to * until end (30 dc)
Round 4: *2 dc in first dc, 1 dc each in next 2 dc* repeat from * to * until end (40 dc)
Round 5: *2 dc in first dc, 1 dc each in next 3 dc* repeat from * to * until end (50 dc)
Rounds 6-12: 1 dc in each dc (50 dc)

Do not bind off after round 12!

Earflaps

Row 1: Turn, ch3 (does not count as first dc, here and throughout earflap), dc 7, turn
Row 2: ch3, dc 7, turn
Row 3: ch3, dc2tog, dc3, dc2tog, turn
Row 4: ch3, dc2tog, dc1, dc2tog, turn
Row 5: 
ch3, dc3, bind off

Count 20. join at 21st and repeat earflap pattern. (I would do row 1 of the second earflap, and then make sure it lines up to your own ears. This is what worked for me!)

Belt

**For this, I just worked the first row of sc in the 10th row of the hat. Since you’re working sc over dc (worked in the round, no less, so I had to mess around with stitch placement to get them to line up), I wouldn’t suggest this method. I mean, it looks fine, but it’ll be much easier to sc a black strip, and just whipstitch or sew it to attach. So, I will give the instructions for a black band.

Chain 51, turn
Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc to end, ch1, turn (50sc)
Row 2: sc in each sc, ch1, turn (50sc)
Repeat row 2 three more times. Attach around hat (mine wound up spanning rows 8-10 of the hat)

Buckle

All you have to do here is surface slip stitch in a vaguely squareish/rectangular shape. Just make sure the top and bottom parts of the buckle are on the red part of the hat, and that the buckle is centered in the front of your head. My buckle was 5 stitches on the top and bottom, and 6 stitches on each side.

Here is a video on how to surface slip stitch: slip stitch surface: http://youtu.be/EJ8FI5PJfvk

Edging

With a fur yarn (I don’t know of any other than Lion Brand Fun Fur), sc all round the hat.

Pom Pom

I used the wrap method, and used width of DVD case and wrapped ~60-70 times. This turned out WAY TOO BIG and lead to 45 minutes of trimming and 15 minutes of vacuuming all the bits. I attached it  just by tying a knot on inside of hat.

This project on Ravelry

National Craft Month Intro & Set-Up

As some crafters may know, March is National Craft Month. I’ve been thinking about it for a few weeks, how I wanted to do something to “celebrate,” but was drawing a blank. Then it hit me – maybe I should unbox the sewing machine I purchased last summer for the first time, and actually use it!

Every week this month, I’m going to write a post about the projects I’m doing with my sewing machine. I am an absolute beginner – that is to say, I haven’t used a sewing machine regularly since home economics class in middle school. I’m very excited to start sewing, and hopefully get to the point I am at with crochet where I can pick up almost anything in the store and say, “I can do that!”

My sister sews on a fairly regular basis (she is basically an apron extraordinaire), so I invited her over one night and we went to the local fabric store for supplies. I got 3 yards of a plain forest green cotton, 1 yard of a decorative blue cotton, matching thread for each, extra needles (for when I surely break mine), and Velcro.

Then it was back to my house to eat dinner and set up the machine. (I felt more comfortable having someone there who was familiar with the hardware – sewing machines have more parts than I am used to with crafting and I was afraid I might break it, regardless of having the instructions.) There’s no point in photographing and explaining how to wind the bobbin, load it, and load the thread and thread the needle, etc. If you are here and having a sewing machine, you likely know how to do it; also sewing machines are slightly different. While setting mine up was MOSTLY the same, my sister came across one or two things that were different from her own machine.

008

The first thing I made was a heating pack. You know, the kind you just throw in the microwave for a few minutes and put on your neck if you have a headache or neck-ache. Or are just cold.

009

I used the tutorial found here. I didn’t pin anything, because I didn’t really care and couldn’t find my pins at that exact moment. Also I’m pretty lazy, but it was just a heating pad for myself, so I wasn’t particularly concerned. As stuffing, I used some white rice we had in the kitchen. The only thing I wish I’d done differently concerns the stuffing – it is SLIGHTLY overstuffed. I used one of the smaller boxes of Minute Rice and part of a bigger box we had leftover, which was a bit too much. You could probably get away with just one regular box of rice. Remember, you still have to be able to drape it around your neck!

Kids’ Winter Hats

Over the summer, my cousin asked if I could make winter hats for her two children. She gave me colors, I sent her a few photos, and we came up with a game plan. Four months was plenty of time to make hats for an almost-4-year-old boy and a one-year-old girl.

Shamefully, I handed them off to the recipients on January 19. I’ll justify by saying that we had a warmer-than-usual winter. (Which, for the record, is true in New Jersey. It was 60 degrees only a two weeks ago.)

027

032

I made these patterns up; I didn’t write them down but they are basic crocheted hats. The girl’s hat was done in a shell stitch, mostly because the yarn I was using was fine and I would have been doing it forever if I did it in single crochet. However, it turns out it added great character to it! Ironically, that is not the first earflap hat I made for that boy, but he was three days old the last time he wore the first one. The spike pattern came from here.

Tip: I didn’t have head sizes, so I used average head sizes from a few places online: here is one of them, here is another. I came to the conclusion that 7 inches in diameter was a good size for a four year old. This is not the diameter of the crown, it is the diameter of the actual hat! The crown should be slightly smaller than the diameter of the hat you are aiming for.

Girl’s Winter Snowflake Hat Ravelry Page
Boy’s Winter Dinosaur Hat Ravelry Page

Decorating for Valentine’s Day

I’m not a huge fan of Valentine’s Day; I’m one of those people who just never really saw the point. As it turns out, my dating anniversary with my husband was a few days after Valentine’s Day, so we never bothered celebrating; now that we’re married we’re probably going to ignore it almost completely. (Winter anniversaries ARE THE WORST, so glad our wedding anniversary is in the spring.)

Anyway, I was surprised when I found myself wanting to decorate the house, even if it was only slightly, for Valentine’s Day. I couldn’t figure out where the urge was coming from. I think it’s the color schemes I’m attracted too – coming off the sparkly-brightness(TM) of Christmas into dreary grey January is welcome at first, but it gets dull rather quickly and the bright reds/pinks/purples/whites offset the seasonal depression that starts to set in.

004

This door decoration is a combination of a few door decorations I’ve seen around the internet. The base letters are made with 12″ silver cake platters that I had lying around from a wreath I had never gotten to make. I’m lucky that X and O are pretty basic letters, but if you want to do something like this with anything other than these letters (or even if you are doing an X and O) I highly suggest getting some ready-made letters. These were EXTREMELY annoying to cut, they shed cardboard dust everywhere, and more than once my crafting knife blade almost came out of the holder.

I used felt to make these petal looking things:

017
First, I cut the felt sheet into quartered strips.

023
Then, I cut each of the strips into squares (or something vaguely square-ish). The shape doesn’t have to be perfect because you won’t notice later.

Then I folded each square in half to make a triangle…
007

And then in half again…
008

And then I snipped off the bottom.
012

Then I just covered the bottom with hot glue and pressed it on my base!
016

In addition to the door, I made a last-minute-I-don’t-feel-like-buying-anything centerpiece with some items I already had.

025

With my immaculately set table.

With my immaculately set table.

The white branches and crystal…things were part of a centerpiece I took from someone’s wedding reception in the beginning of January. The glass beads I had lying around, and this is the replacement vase for the one I broke in the process of putting this simple centerpiece together…

003

Apparently mixing glass beads in a glass vase is a terrible idea that results in tragedy. WHO KNEW.

Face Wash Using Oil Cleansing Method

If anyone has followed my blog since the beginning, or if you have trudged through the archives, you’ll recall my brief foray into the no-shampoo movement, where instead of using shampoo & conditioner on your hair, you use a baking soda-water mix as shampoo, and ACV-water mix as conditioner. I never stuck with it, because besides trying to use a watery substance as shampoo, I have such short hair easy hair that I never noticed any benefits. Also my current shampoo smells like Cocoa Puffs which is so much better smelling than that ACV rinse. (Try as I might, I cannot bring myself to use ACV for all the amazing health benefits, because it just tastes & smells SO AWFUL.)


With the advent of Pinterest, I’ve come across loads of other DIY beauty tips, and the oil cleansing method to wash ones face was rather intriguing. Partially because it was oil, and partially because my cleanser was something like $50 for a bottle (admittedly, a rather big bottle, but still). So when I finally got to the end of the cleanser I’d been using, I decided to give it a go, using the previous link from SimpleMom.net as a guide.


Now, oil seems counter-intuitive to wash your face with, but as the Tsh says, it actually makes sense – oil cancels out oil. This immediately made sense to me, and I probably averaged a B- in my science classes in high school. Since I tend to have oily/combination skin, I used 3 parts castor oil to 1 part olive oil. For some reason, actually finding castor oil was the most ridiculous part of this method. I wound up ordering off of Amazon. I mixed it, massaged it into my face, and used a hot washcloth to steam my face.

Oils

After only 2 days, I noticed my skin was less oily overall. Combine that with the cost, and this cleanser is here to stay for me. I think I might need to add a bit more olive oil, as my skin sometimes feels a little dry afterwards, but I’ll wait a few months because I can’t tell if it’s the mixture or the cold weather. The only con I have found to this is that it’s oil. That’s to say, if it gets in your hair, you will look like a greasy hobo. So, I only wash my face right before I’m about to get into the shower so I can be as messy as I want. (I’m not an overly messy person, I’m just lazy about being neat.)


If you try this and come across issues, or just want more information, the comments on the blog post I linked have great advice. I also exfoliate with either baking soda, or a mixture of honey and brown sugar, so I just need to find a mask that I love and I’ll be set. (By the way, the honey/brown sugar exfoliation is DELICIOUS when it accidentally winds up on your lips.)


Have you tried anything like this? Would you? If you have, what were your recipe and results?

Don’t forget to like on Facebook and follow me on Twitter!

Homemade Peppermint Marshmallows

I like to live life frugally. So every Christmas I usually wind up making many of the gifts I give to people; either something entirely handmade or, more often, something handmade to go along with what I’ve already purchased. More than being frugal, however, I feel like handmade is far more heartfelt. A lot of people don’t realize the time and effort it takes to make gifts and think it’s merely a way to cop out of spending money, which makes me sad. When I crochet even just a hat, it takes hours of my time, and that ought to be worth more than any money I were to drop on something found in a store.

Now that I’ve had my rant, the point was that I got my cousin a mug for Christmas from Ghost Adventures on Travel Channel (which is one of the best reality shows next to Ancient Aliens) and found a neat post on Pinterest on a layered hot chocolate recipe – perfect! The recipe called for crushed peppermint starlights/candy canes, but thanks to another post from Pinterest, I decided to omit that part and replace it with homemade peppermint marshmallows from the Betty Crocker website.

Ingredients

  • Butter for greasing – I just sprayed my Pyrex with cooking spray
  • 1/3 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cup corn syrup – MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THIS AND DON’T TRY TO SUBSTITUTE IT. More on that later.
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon pure peppermint extract – I used imitation peppermint extract because that’s what Shop Rite had, and it was fine
  • 8 to 10 drops red food color – I think I wound up using like, fifteen
  1. Generously grease bottom and sides of 11×7-inch (2-quart) glass baking dish with butter; dust with 1 tablespoon of the powdered sugar. In bowl of stand mixer, sprinkle gelatin over 1/2 cup cold water to soften; set aside.
  2. In 2-quart saucepan, heat granulated sugar, corn syrup, salt and 1/2 cup water over low heat, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved. Heat to boiling; cook without stirring about 30 minutes to 240°F on candy thermometer or until small amount of mixture dropped into cup of very cold water forms a ball that holds its shape but is pliable; remove from heat. I don’t have a candy thermometer, nor do I have the patience to check the temperature the way it is listed, so after bringing it to a boil I lowered the temperature and just let it do its thing for 30 minutes.
  3. Slowly pour syrup into softened gelatin while beating on low speed. Increase speed to high; beat 8 to 10 minutes or until mixture is white and has almost tripled in volume. Add peppermint extract; beat on high speed 1 minute. Pour into baking dish, patting lightly with wet hands. Drop food color randomly onto top of marshmallow mixture. Pull table knife through food color to create swirl pattern over top. Let stand uncovered at least 8 hours or overnight.
  4. 001

  5. Dust cutting board with about 1 tablespoon powdered sugar. Place remaining powdered sugar in small bowl. To remove marshmallow mixture, loosen sides from dish and gently lift in one piece onto cutting board. Using sharp knife greased with butter, cut into 1-inch squares (11 rows by 7 rows). Dust bottom and sides of each marshmallow by dipping into bowl of powdered sugar. Store in airtight container at room temperature up to 3 weeks.

In regards to my note about the corn syrup, I didn’t realize until I had already put the gelatin and water in my mixer that I had none, so I looked up a substitute online because I actually do that quite a bit with ingredients I don’t normally keep in the house. Well, the substitute for corn syrup is water and sugar. When you try to mix that with MORE water and sugar, disaster strikes. And by disaster I mean after almost an hour your sugar will still have not dissolved. I had to admit defeat and put the gelatin & water mix in the refrigerator overnight; after coming back home with the corn syrup everything went fine.

010

008

I’m still trying to get through all the marshmallows. I’m sure I won’t, but suddenly I have a strong desire for hot chocolate…

Don’t forget to like on Facebook and follow me on Twitter!

Liara From Mass Effect 3

I’m not quite sure where to start this one; there’s no easy way to describe Mass Effect without playing it. As someone who has logged almost 300 hours of playtime for the series (judge me I don’t care it was worth it) I can tell you it takes place in the future where people fly around to different clusters within the galaxy and there’s aliens. I guess that’s all you need to know in order for this to make sense, but I STRONGLY suggest you just buy the games. The first two are probably $20 each now and you’ll get more satisfaction than you probably will from a month of World of Warcraft.

ANYWAY, there is a character named Liara who is an alien – an asari, actually. I recreated her in her Mass Effect 3 garb because there was something I really liked about the outfit. It’s weird, there’s is (what seems to be) a pretty high percentage of people who LOVE the asari, especially this character; I’m not one of those people. I don’t hate her, but if you’ve played the first game you’ll know what I mean when I say she’s naive, and her naivety enrages me in that game. You don’t really see much of her in Mass Effect 2, and by Mass Effect 3 you’ve formed relationships with so many awesome characters…by that point I just didn’t care about her anymore. The asari and their obnoxious omnipotence can eat dirt – compare them to the turians or the drell and they’re easily swept aside. If you’re me, I guess.

Liara Mass Effect 3

Yarn Liara

I made this up as I went and never wrote a pattern or really measured anything…it shows as her head is huge compared to the rest of her body; I wasn’t able to get her headcrest positioned correctly either. I think the proportions would look better if I had bigger eyes, but I bought a bag of 25 pairs and wasn’t about to buy more when I had that many laying around. Also, they are surprisingly difficult to find anyway.

Yarn Liara's uneven headcrests

Not sure who I’ll make next – my heart says Garrus, but I’m still burnt out with the headcrest so I don’t know if I want to tackle turian mandibles. Maybe Vega. I freaking love that guy. Or Blastos, because what the hell else am I going to do with the huge ball of pink yarn I have laying around?

Don’t forget to like on Facebook and follow me on Twitter!

Christmas In July Scarf

I got an early start on Christmas gifts this year!

Just the scarf, not the cat. I used this Lion Brand pattern, which is RIDICULOUSLY simple, but the thick yarn and giant hook gave it an interesting look.

This project on Ravelry

More Baby Crochet

Way back in the end of May, I started making some baby items for a family friend who just had a little boy. She contacted me out of the blue the other day, which finally inspired me to buckle down and finish. (The sad part is the only things that needed to be finished were weaving in the ends…I always hate doing that!) The baby’s parents are country music fans, so I went with baby cowboy items.

Image

 

I LOVED these little cowboy boots, the pattern was great and so was the payoff!

 

Image

 

I wish I could say I loved the hat pattern as much as the boot pattern. Maybe it’s just me and the yarn I used, but it doesn’t lay like a cowboy hat AT ALL. Hrumph. There are other baby cowboy hat patterns that I would encourage people to try out before this one.

Baby Boots on Ravelry

Baby Hat on Ravelry